What’s New Around The Blogosphere: May 18th, 2012

The Bank of Montreal released a study this week saying that 51% of Canadian homeowners plan to carry a mortgage into retirement.  The study went on to say that half of Canadian homeowners age 50-59 still have mortgage debt, and by age 60-69, 25% of those people still have a mortgage.

This is an alarming trend, but really no surprise when you consider the high real estate prices in Canada and our tendency to take on mortgages with longer amortization periods.  A 35-year old couple buying a home today might still be making mortgage payments into their 60′s.

In other news, Facebook shares are set to begin trading today and could be valued at $100 billion by the end of the day.  That’s roughly 16 times the market cap of Research In Motion, even though RIM’s revenues are 4 times higher.

Here’s a look at some other interesting personal finance articles from around the blogosphere this week:

  1. Cash Money Life explains why resume fraud is never a good idea
  2. Free From Broke asks should you charge your Boomerang kids rent?
  3. Retire Happy Blog looks at negotiating retirement as a couple
  4. Young and Thrifty compares RRSP vs RESP accounts
  5. Money Mamba explains why everything you thought about stock picking is wrong
  6. Canadian Finance Blog looks at marrying for money and earning potential
  7. Money Smarts Blog asks should you sell your house and avoid the market crash?
  8. Financial Highway looks at increasing fixed income returns
  9. Big Cajun Man says you should take advantage of the rules when you can
  10. My University Money asks are banks really in it for you?

We were also included in the following blog carnivals this week:

Have a great weekend, everyone!


5 Responses to What’s New Around The Blogosphere: May 18th, 2012

  1. Thanks for the link! FB’s valuation is nearly criminal. For the price of FB you could own Ford, GM, and AFLAC outright and still have a few billion left over. Crazy.

  2. Thanks for the mention.

    Sixty year olds who have a mortgage are poor financial managers. Most of them probably bought their first house a long time ago (when very cheap), so they must have continued to buy more expensive homes over time or borrowed their equity.

    Either way – not good.

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